Smileys by Design
Ph 0424 770811
info@smileys.com.au


• EPS

EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) files are self-contained PostScript graphic documents, usually containing both an on-screen preview function and the PostScript (PS) file data for PostScript printing. The EPS format describes both pixel and exported vector graphics. EPS files are high quality, very large memory files regularly used by design and print professionals, due to their lossless (no data lost) format. EPS files are useful to retain ‘clipping paths’, which are created to define selected parts of an overall pixel image, for final output via page layout programs. The file extension for this format is .eps

• TIFF

TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) files contain flexible information fields, called ‘tags’ which allows the format to handle multiple images and data in a single file. The TIFF format differs from others through the use of these tags which also offer the ability to use a wide range of compression schemes and colour spaces. TIFF files are high quality, large memory files (slightly smaller memory size compared to an EPS file) regularly used by design and print professionals, due to their lossless (no data lost) format. When saving a TIFF file the option to select the byte order for a Mac or PC is available, however most recent software applications can usually read either option. Also available are several compression techniques for producing a smaller file, but using any of these options is not advisable for producing a suitable file for printing. The file extensions for this format are .tif and .tiff

• JPEG

JPEG (Joint Photographics Experts Group) files are based on a set of compression algorithms developed by the JPEG committee in 1992. This method for saving photographic images is a lossy compression format, which means that some visual quality is lost as the format selectively discards data when saved under this standard. JPEG is the most popular format in use on the web, due to the availability to trade the balance of image quality with file size when saving. JPEG is also widely used as the standard format on digital cameras, which requires images to be saved at maximum dimensions to compensate for any quality deterioration. Due to its lossy format JPEG is not the desired method for saving images destined for professional print projects. The most common file extensions for this format are .jpg and .jpeg

• GIF

GIF (Graphics Interchange Format) files contain a limitation of 256 distinct colours, which makes them unsuitable for photographic images, but popular for simple graphics and logos featuring a limited number of solid colours. GIF are lossless (no data lost) compressed files using the LZW compression method, which reduces file size, whilst preserving sharp edges and without affecting image quality. GIF is a very popular format for both images and animation on the web. The file extension for this format is .gif

• PNG

PNG (Portable Network Graphics) format was developed in 1995 as a replacement for GIF and offers improved colour depth, transparency, interlacing and compression, but does not support animation. PNG are lossless (no data lost) compressed files using a method known as ‘deflation’. As with the GIF format, PNG is unsuitable for photographic images for print purposes. The file extension for this format is .png

• BMP

BMP (bitmap) is also known as Device Independent Bitmap (DIB) and is a simple graphics file standard for Microsoft Windows 3.0 or later. The colour depth can range from 1-bit to 24-bit and as BMP files do not feature compression (so are typically much larger than those saved in other formats, ie GIF or PNG) are rarely viable for web use. BMP files are unsuitable for photographic images for print purposes. The file extensions for this format are .bmp and .dib

Avast Anit-Virus

free anti virus

VIRUS

virus removal

UPGRADE

computer upgrade

WIRELESS

wireless connection